OMCA Blog: Posts tagged "art"

  • A family photo of former Black Panther Rodney Barnette and daughter Sadie Barnette. Photo courtesy of Rodney and Sadie Barnette
    November 4, 2016
    For her installation for OMCA's exhibition All Power to the People: Black Panthers at 50, artist Sadie Barnette repurposed the FBI file collected on her father, Rodney Barnette, during his time as the co-founder of the Compton section of the Black Panther Party. As the exhibition opened to the public, Sadie and Rodney spoke with each other about family history, personal politics in art, and the lessons today’s activists can take from the Panthers.
  • October 7, 2016
    There is no better time than the present—as the country mourns the many recent casualties of racial violence—to reflect upon the powerful legacy of the Black Panther Party, which marks its 50th anniversary this year. OMCA’s new exhibition All Power to the People: Black Panthers at 50 takes a fresh look at this revolutionary Oakland-born organization, creating a space for visitors to gain insight into the many different narratives created about, for, and by the Panthers. 
  • Fantastic Negrito. Image: Kristian Dior
    October 4, 2016
    Musician Fantastic Negrito's recent rise to fame includies having won NPR’s Tiny Desk Concert Contest, performing at major music festival Outside Lands, and appearing on Empire—to name just a few of his feats. His latest is album is the soundtrack to OMCA exhibition, Oakland, I Want You to Know... We spoke to Fantastic about how he thinks artists can be a bridge between the old Oakland and the new.
  • Linda Fleming, Glimmer, 2016. Oakland Museum of California
    September 20, 2016
    As you walk up the steps to Oakland Museum of California’s Oak Street entrance, a glimpse of contrasting layers of powder-coated steel in bright colors, electrifying shapes, and dynamic patterns against the backdrop of a bright blue sky peeks through, energizing the space. The newest sculpture in OMCA’s iconic gardens, Glimmer by Linda Fleming is a site-specific installation on the third level terraces that brings vibrancy to the garden.
  • A Guatemalan kite of remembrance created by Jamie Treacy's student Diamond in honor of her grandmother, Rose
    August 15, 2016
    Jamie Treacy is an art teacher who has been bringing students to the Oakland Museum of California for years, including sharing student art work for our Días de los Muertos exhibitions. We sat down with him over the summer to talk about how he hopes to encourage students to pursue careers in the arts and how art can be a part of the healing process.

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