OMCA Blog: Oakland Says

  • Yellow squash from City Slicker Farms in West Oakland.
    November 21, 2017
    Our upcoming exhibition, Take Root: Oakland Grows Food, is all about the ecological and cultural factors of how and why food is grown in Oakland, using interactive features to help us all understand what factors determine where, how, why, and what is grown throughout the city. You could check off the bulk of your produce for Thanksgiving and all other upcoming winter feasts on your list by shopping at local markets!
  • OMCA Senior Curator of History Louise Pubols at work on the Gallery of California History
    November 13, 2017
    As I remember our dear colleague, Louise Pubols, former Senior Curator of History here at the Oakland Museum of California who passed away earlier this year, I can picture so many moments from the years we worked together. Memories of her are intertwined with all of the exhibitions she led throughout her tenure here, like The 1968 Exhibit in 2012 and Above & Below: Stories of our Changing Bay in 2013. 
  • Artists from Visual Element utilized posters created by East Side Arts Alliance about housing issues to create a wheatpaste wall. Above, a replicated billboard from West Oakland paints a stark picture of how some in the community feel about newcomers.
    November 7, 2017
    Since our founding in 1969, the Oakland Museum of California’s mission has been “to be the museum of the People.” That mission remains at the core of who we are and what we do today. But what does it mean to be the “Museum of the People” in the 21st century? One of the ways we live out this value today is how we create our exhibitions—we invite members of the community to collaborate with us.
  • Bay Area artist Favianna Rodriguez painting Monarch Butterflies
    September 20, 2017
    Dear OMCA Friends and Supporters: Over the past year, the Oakland Museum of California has explored and highlighted art created to inspire social change—from Emory Douglas’ bold graphics for the Black Panther Party newspapers to Dorothea Lange’s heartrending photographs of the Japanese-American internment camps. In the coming year, we will have the joy of experiencing art made to transform, uplift, and connect—and to impact social change at the same time.
  • James Baldwin quote on the chalkboard at the Oakland Museum of California
    August 28, 2017
    This morning, we walked into the Oak Street Plaza after a turbulent weekend in the Bay Area, and an especially busy weekend at the Museum, to find a rainbow of chalk colors and a vibrant spectrum of words from our community.

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