OMCA Blog: Grounds, Gardens, and Galleries

  • An annual crop of ducklings hatches every year at OMCA... only to meet a predictable demise.
    April 19, 2017
    Staff who have worked at OMCA for more than one springtime know the story—like clockwork, when the weather changes, a mallard pair alights in the Museum gardens, finds a secluded spot, and gets on with the business of hatching ducklings. Staff and visitors alike are delighted by the sight of the adorable brood marching around the Museum for maybe a day or two, until disaster—or maybe just animal nature—strikes.
  • April 5, 2017
    There’s a theory—it may or may not belong to Albert Einstein—that should the planet’s bees suddenly die out, all humanity would be gone within four years.   Sound dire? It’s not unthinkable. California’s 1,600 different species of native bees represent one of the most important and fascinating links in our ecosystem. But bees’ numbers are shrinking: Climate change, pesticides, dwindling food supply, devastating parasites, and disease all contribute to their decline.
  • Dorothea Lange, Manzanar Relocation Center, June 29, 1942. Gelatin silver  print, 11 x 14 in. Collection of the Oakland Museum of California, gift of Paul S.  Taylor
    February 15, 2017
    When OMCA reinstalled its Gallery of California History five years ago, the Sent Away exhibit concerning the Tanforan Assembly Center in San Bruno, where over seven thousand Japanese Americans were held before being sent to internment camps, struck a deep chord for many visitors. It had particular resonance for those of Japanese ancestry, many of whom had firsthand knowledge of this dark moment in our history.
  • Linda Fleming, Glimmer, 2016. Oakland Museum of California
    September 20, 2016
    As you walk up the steps to Oakland Museum of California’s Oak Street entrance, a glimpse of contrasting layers of powder-coated steel in bright colors, electrifying shapes, and dynamic patterns against the backdrop of a bright blue sky peeks through, energizing the space. The newest sculpture in OMCA’s iconic gardens, Glimmer by Linda Fleming is a site-specific installation on the third level terraces that brings vibrancy to the garden.
  • A young girl looks through binoculars
    September 13, 2016
    Pigeons, robins, and finches are certainly no strangers to city dwellers. But when talk turns to bird conservation, most of the attention tends to be paid to the more exotic—or at least less common—avian species than to our own urban neighbors.