OMCA Blog: From the Archives

  • A Day for Women's Rights: Ratify the ERA equal rights amendment poster in the Oakland Museum of California
    August 26, 2017
    This week we’re honoring Women’s Equality Day, which became a nationally recognized commemorative day in the 1970s. August 26, 1920 was the pivotal day that the U.S. Constitution formally adopted the Nineteenth Amendment and granted American women the constitutional right to vote.
  • Binders of Dorothea Lange's contact sheets archived in the Oakland Museum of California collections
    August 18, 2017
    Housing Dorothea Lange’s entire collection, the Oakland Museum of California gets extra close-up interactions with the art. Two of OMCA’s team played extra hands-on roles in producing never-seen-before prints for Politics of Seeing.  
  • Libby Black, Gucci Golf Bag, 2004. Mixed media, H: 45 in, W: 19 in, D: 10 in. Acquired through funds provided by Judy and Bill Timken
    March 3, 2017
    For Women’s History Month, the National Museum of Women in the Arts has brought back its annual social media challenge to ask, “Can you name five women artists?” This year, OMCA joins over 200 institutions in meeting the challenge by highlighting five incredible living women artists from our collection—and we’re raising you one bonus artist for good measure.
  • Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary. Joe Hoyt/NOAA
    February 17, 2017
    Today, the Oakland Museum of California joins hundreds of other organizations to mark the #DayofFacts. From the treatment of Native Californians to California's shared history with Mexico, to how climate change impacts Yosemite and the Bay Area, OMCA's collections and galleries are an incredibly rich and trusted source of facts on a range of topics.
  • W.H. McFarlane, Sequoia Wellingtonia. The Two Guardsmen, circa 1860. Hand-colored lithograph. Collection OMCA, Gift of the J. B. and Emily Van Nuys Charities
    January 9, 2017
    In Calaveras County this weekend, we lost a literal giant. The Sequoiadendron giganteum, or giant sequoia known as the Pioneer Cabin Tree, iconic for the tunnel carved into its base wide enough for a car to pass through, fell after being hit with heavy rains and wind.

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