OMCA Blog: Posts tagged "photography"

  • Binders of Dorothea Lange's contact sheets archived in the Oakland Museum of California collections
    August 18, 2017
    Housing Dorothea Lange’s entire collection, the Oakland Museum of California gets extra close-up interactions with the art. Two of OMCA’s team played extra hands-on roles in producing never-seen-before prints for Politics of Seeing.  
  • Installation shot inside Oakland Museum of California's exhibition of Dorothea Lange photography
    July 27, 2017
    OMCA is home to photographer Dorothea Lange’s entire personal archive. That’s 25,000 negatives, 6,000 vintage prints, field notes, and memorabilia! Our exhibition Dorothea Lange: Politics of Seeing celebrates the museum’s acquisition of the collection fifty years ago. We asked curator Drew Johnson to share what it was like to curate the show.  
  • Woman looking pensive holding two children. Migrant Monther by Dorothea Lange, collection of the Oakland Museum of Caliofornia
    July 27, 2017
    Watch archival video interviews with Dorothea Lange, one of the greatest American photographers, speaking about her belief of how empathy and compassion—focused through art—can trigger political action and social change. 
  • Dorothea Lange holding a camera sitting on top of a car in Texas
    June 23, 2017
    Best known for her iconic images of migrant farmworkers during the Depression, the Bay Area-based Dorothea Lange also photographed the urban homeless and Japanese-Americans incarcerated during World War II. Her work further addressed community displacement and the urban criminal justice system, reflecting its racial and class issues.
  • Kenneth Green, Sr., untitled (self-portrait). Courtesy of Kenneth Green, Jr.
    November 17, 2016
    Kenneth Green, Sr. was the first African American staff photographer at The Oakland Tribune. He documented cultural and civic life in Oakland from 1968 until his tragic death in 1982 at the age of 40. Green’s photography included images of history-making candidates like Ron Dellums and the beginning of the Black Panther Party.