OMCA Blog: Posts tagged "Metamorphosis & Migration"

  • November 30, 2017
    Metamorphosis & Migration: Days of the Dead Guest Curator Evelyn Orantes reflects on cultural and personal traditions of remembrance, and the human impulse to create rituals to help us outwardly express our inner emotions. Artists use that impulse and gift us with artworks that give form to the things that live in our hearts and minds.  
  • November 28, 2017
    On December 2, 2016, 36 people perished in a fire in the Ghost Ship warehouse, not far from the Oakland Museum of California. Many of those who were lost were artists or involved in some way in creative expression—musicians, sound engineers, writers—and included filmmaker Alex Ghassan, who worked closely with OMCA. Lori Fogarty reflects on the tragedy one year later, and the site of the Museum as a space for gathering in community. 
  • Museum visitors pose in front of Favianna Rodriguez's Migration Is Beautiful artwork at the Oakland Museum of California Days of the Dead exhibition.
    October 31, 2017
    Favianna Rodriguez firmly believes in the power of art to inspire lasting social change. Her piece in this year’s Days of the Dead exhibition Metamorphosis & Migration, guest curated by Evelyn Orantes, reflects on the theme of immigration; her previous works have addressed global politics, inequality, gender justice, climate change, and sexual freedom.
  • Days of the Dead skeleton skull mugs at the OMCA Store
    October 20, 2017
    Get in the Fall spirit with the OMCA Store, featuring a fresh selection of Days of the Dead-themed artwork, apparel, decorations, and more in conjunction with our new Days of the Dead exhibition, Metamorphosis & Migration (on view through January 14, 2018) and Community Celebration on Sunday, October 22.
  • Bay Area artist Favianna Rodriguez painting Monarch Butterflies
    September 20, 2017
    Dear OMCA Friends and Supporters: Over the past year, the Oakland Museum of California has explored and highlighted art created to inspire social change—from Emory Douglas’ bold graphics for the Black Panther Party newspapers to Dorothea Lange’s heartrending photographs of the Japanese-American internment camps. In the coming year, we will have the joy of experiencing art made to transform, uplift, and connect—and to impact social change at the same time.