OMCA Blog: Posts tagged "history"

  • "Love makes america great" and other notes written on the OMCA chalkboard walk by marchers at the Women's March. Photo: Emily Quist
    January 27, 2017
    In 2017, the people of Oakland made history. Part of the coordinated national and international Women’s Marches, the Oakland March took place at 11 am on January 21, the day after the presidential inauguration. In San Francisco and Oakland, both events had estimated crowds of 100,000 people who marched in the cold and rain to show their solidarity. Many of OMCA’s own staff participated—check out some of their photos, reflections, and reasons for marching. 
  • Chinaka Hodge. Photo: Courtesy of the artist
    January 16, 2017
    Genre-busting artists Chinaka Hodge and Hank Willis Thomas are among the contemporary contributors to All Power to the People: Black Panthers at 50. Here, they converse about how the Black Panther movement has influenced them.
  • W.S. King and Conwell Graphic Companies, Lest They Parish, circa 1915. Poster, 18.5 x 12.375 in. Collection of the Oakland Museum of California, Gift of American Committee for relief in the near east.
    December 18, 2016
    History, of course, is not just what is written in textbooks; it is ever-present and ever-evolving, as visitors are experiencing firsthand in a dynamic section of the Gallery of California History at the Oakland Museum of California. With the title “History Now,” this space invites visitors to make connections between past and present issues and respond to thought-provoking questions.
  • PUMA x Undefeated, Clyde Gametime Gold, 2012. PUMA Archives. Photo: Ron Wood. Courtesy American Federation of Arts/Bata Shoe Museum
    November 28, 2016
    Ask any teenage boy willing to shell out $245 for a customized version of Kobe XI Elite ID basketball shoes: Sneakers are far more than utilitarian protection for your feet. They’ve been icons of sports and style for nearly two centuries. Starting December 22, OMCA will explore the art and impact of this fashion staple in the new exhibition Out of the Box: The Rise of Sneaker Culture.
  • Corrina Gould, Native American Educator at OMCA, with a group of students, showing them original Ohlone territories in the Bay Area. Photo: Odell Hussey Photography
    November 18, 2016
    As part of our School Programs offerings, Bay Area students get an opportunity to learn with Native American educator Corrina Gould, who teaches a portion of the school program called California Indian Living. In an interactive presentation, Gould shares about her cultural heritage, identity, and the ways in which Native Californians are continuing to teach and honor their traditions.

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