OMCA Blog: Posts tagged "history"

  • Libby Black, Gucci Golf Bag, 2004. Mixed media, H: 45 in, W: 19 in, D: 10 in. Acquired through funds provided by Judy and Bill Timken
    March 3, 2017
    For Women’s History Month, the National Museum of Women in the Arts has brought back its annual social media challenge to ask, “Can you name five women artists?” This year, OMCA joins over 200 institutions in meeting the challenge by highlighting five incredible living women artists from our collection—and we’re raising you one bonus artist for good measure.
  • Out of the Box: The Rise of Sneaker Culture exhibition catalog.
    March 2, 2017
    March 2 marks annual Read Across America Day, a program of the National Education Association. Now in its 20th year, the event encourages students and adults alike to indulge in the incredible feeling of devouring a great book. Here are some great picks from the OMCA Store to get you started.
  • Ericka Huggins. Photo: Terry Lorant
    February 22, 2017
    Ericka Huggins led the Black Panther Party’s Los Angeles chapter with her husband, John Huggins, only to have to cope with his killing; she endured two years in jail while awaiting trial with Bobby Seale; and later became director of the groundbreaking Oakland Community School. Huggins is now a speaker and teacher who engages audiences at leading universities and offers relaxation classes in youth correctional facilities.
  • Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary. Joe Hoyt/NOAA
    February 17, 2017
    Today, the Oakland Museum of California joins hundreds of other organizations to mark the #DayofFacts. From the treatment of Native Californians to California's shared history with Mexico, to how climate change impacts Yosemite and the Bay Area, OMCA's collections and galleries are an incredibly rich and trusted source of facts on a range of topics.
  • Dorothea Lange, Manzanar Relocation Center, June 29, 1942. Gelatin silver  print, 11 x 14 in. Collection of the Oakland Museum of California, gift of Paul S.  Taylor
    February 15, 2017
    When OMCA reinstalled its Gallery of California History five years ago, the Sent Away exhibit concerning the Tanforan Assembly Center in San Bruno, where over seven thousand Japanese Americans were held before being sent to internment camps, struck a deep chord for many visitors. It had particular resonance for those of Japanese ancestry, many of whom had firsthand knowledge of this dark moment in our history.

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