OMCA Blog: Posts tagged "history"

  • Dorothea Lange holding a camera sitting on top of a car in Texas
    Best known for her iconic images of migrant farmworkers during the Depression, the Bay Area-based Dorothea Lange also photographed the urban homeless and Japanese-Americans incarcerated during World War II. Her work further addressed community displacement and the urban criminal justice system, reflecting its racial and class issues.
  • An annual crop of ducklings hatches every year at OMCA... only to meet a predictable demise.
    Staff who have worked at OMCA for more than one springtime know the story—like clockwork, when the weather changes, a mallard pair alights in the Museum gardens, finds a secluded spot, and gets on with the business of hatching ducklings. Staff and visitors alike are delighted by the sight of the adorable brood marching around the Museum for maybe a day or two, until disaster—or maybe just animal nature—strikes.
  • There’s a theory—it may or may not belong to Albert Einstein—that should the planet’s bees suddenly die out, all humanity would be gone within four years.   Sound dire? It’s not unthinkable. California’s 1,600 different species of native bees represent one of the most important and fascinating links in our ecosystem. But bees’ numbers are shrinking: Climate change, pesticides, dwindling food supply, devastating parasites, and disease all contribute to their decline.
  • An OMCA Docent leads a tour for a diverse group of students. Photo: Odell Hussey Photography
  • Libby Black, Gucci Golf Bag, 2004. Mixed media, H: 45 in, W: 19 in, D: 10 in. Acquired through funds provided by Judy and Bill Timken
    For Women’s History Month, the National Museum of Women in the Arts has brought back its annual social media challenge to ask, “Can you name five women artists?” Faced with inequality in the arts world, this challenge is meant to inspire conversation and bring awareness about incredible women to a large audience. This year, OMCA joins over 200 institutions in meeting the challenge by highlighting five incredible living women artists from our collection—and we’re raising you one bonus artist for good measure.

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