OMCA Blog: Posts tagged "Dorothea Lange"

  • Portrait of intern Austen Wianecki posed with text "Dorothea Lange: Politics of Seeing."
    February 1, 2018
    As a Museum Studies graduate student and East Bay resident, landing an internship at the Oakland Museum of California was really a dream come true. From July to August 2017, I was the Evaluation and Visitor Insights intern, working specifically on the 2017 exhibition Dorothea Lange: Politics of Seeing.
  • Binders of Dorothea Lange's contact sheets archived in the Oakland Museum of California collections
    August 18, 2017
    Housing Dorothea Lange’s entire collection, the Oakland Museum of California gets extra close-up interactions with the art. Two of OMCA’s team played extra hands-on roles in producing never-seen-before prints for Politics of Seeing.  
  • Installation shot inside Oakland Museum of California's exhibition of Dorothea Lange photography
    July 29, 2017
    OMCA is home to photographer Dorothea Lange’s entire personal archive. That’s 25,000 negatives, 6,000 vintage prints, field notes, and memorabilia! Our exhibition Dorothea Lange: Politics of Seeing celebrates the museum’s acquisition of the collection fifty years ago. We asked curator Drew Johnson to share what it was like to curate the show.  
  • Manzanar Internment Camp photographed by Dorothea Lange
    July 28, 2017
    A few days ago, the Oakland Museum of California was alerted to a very unfortunate incident experienced by a visiting group of artists to the exhibition, Dorothea Lange: The Politics of Seeing. One of the visitors is Japanese American, and she described in a poignant blog post her experience of inappropriate and bigoted comments from a volunteer docent who conducted the tour of the exhibition. 
  • Woman looking pensive holding two children. Migrant Monther by Dorothea Lange, collection of the Oakland Museum of Caliofornia
    July 27, 2017
    Watch archival video interviews with Dorothea Lange, one of the greatest American photographers, speaking about her belief of how empathy and compassion—focused through art—can trigger political action and social change.