OMCA Blog: Posts tagged "community"

  • W.S. King and Conwell Graphic Companies, Lest They Parish, circa 1915. Poster, 18.5 x 12.375 in. Collection of the Oakland Museum of California, Gift of American Committee for relief in the near east.
    December 18, 2016
    History, of course, is not just what is written in textbooks; it is ever-present and ever-evolving, as visitors are experiencing firsthand in a dynamic section of the Gallery of California History at the Oakland Museum of California. With the title “History Now,” this space invites visitors to make connections between past and present issues and respond to thought-provoking questions.
  • Alex Frantz Ghassan sitting in exhibition Oakland, I want you to know... Photo by Forrealism.com
    December 7, 2016
    "Oakland, I want you to know I am honored you allowed my lens to capture your story.” —Alex Frantz Ghassan
  • Corrina Gould, Native American Educator at OMCA, with a group of students, showing them original Ohlone territories in the Bay Area. Photo: Odell Hussey Photography
    November 18, 2016
    As part of our School Programs offerings, Bay Area students get an opportunity to learn with Native American educator Corrina Gould, who teaches a portion of the school program called California Indian Living. In an interactive presentation, Gould shares about her cultural heritage, identity, and the ways in which Native Californians are continuing to teach and honor their traditions.
  • Kenneth Green, Sr., untitled (self-portrait). Courtesy of Kenneth Green, Jr.
    November 17, 2016
    Kenneth Green, Sr. was the first African American staff photographer at The Oakland Tribune. He documented cultural and civic life in Oakland from 1968 until his tragic death in 1982 at the age of 40. Green’s photography included images of history-making candidates like Ron Dellums and the beginning of the Black Panther Party.
  • A family photo of former Black Panther Rodney Barnette and daughter Sadie Barnette. Photo courtesy of Rodney and Sadie Barnette
    November 4, 2016
    For her installation for OMCA's exhibition All Power to the People: Black Panthers at 50, artist Sadie Barnette repurposed the FBI file collected on her father, Rodney Barnette, during his time as the co-founder of the Compton section of the Black Panther Party. As the exhibition opened to the public, Sadie and Rodney spoke with each other about family history, personal politics in art, and the lessons today’s activists can take from the Panthers.

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