OMCA Blog: Posts tagged "African American"

  • Out of the Box: The Rise of Sneaker Culture exhibition catalog.
    March 2, 2017
    March 2 marks annual Read Across America Day, a program of the National Education Association. Now in its 20th year, the event encourages students and adults alike to indulge in the incredible feeling of devouring a great book. Here are some great picks from the OMCA Store to get you started.
  • Ericka Huggins. Photo: Terry Lorant
    February 22, 2017
    Ericka Huggins led the Black Panther Party’s Los Angeles chapter with her husband, John Huggins, only to have to cope with his killing; she endured two years in jail while awaiting trial with Bobby Seale; and later became director of the groundbreaking Oakland Community School. Huggins is now a speaker and teacher who engages audiences at leading universities and offers relaxation classes in youth correctional facilities.
  • Chinaka Hodge. Photo: Courtesy of the artist
    January 16, 2017
    Genre-busting artists Chinaka Hodge and Hank Willis Thomas are among the contemporary contributors to All Power to the People: Black Panthers at 50. Here, they converse about how the Black Panther movement has influenced them.
  • Rue Mapp, founder of Outdoor Afro, in Redwood Regional Park. Photo: Terry Lorant
    September 13, 2016
    From its ethnic makeup to its natural landscape, Oakland's story is constantly evolving. That’s why, according to Rue Mapp, Oakland needs organizations that can bring people together in the places they call home. Mapp’s nonprofit, Outdoor Afro, uses volunteers and social media to organize outdoor excursions for a nationwide network of members. OMCA recently partnered with Outdoor Afro to integrate outdoor experiences with the Museum's valuable natural sciences resources.
  • A young girl looks through binoculars
    September 13, 2016
    Pigeons, robins, and finches are certainly no strangers to city dwellers. But when talk turns to bird conservation, most of the attention tends to be paid to the more exotic—or at least less common—avian species than to our own urban neighbors.