OMCA Blog: Posts tagged "activism"

  • Dorothea Lange holding a camera sitting on top of a car in Texas
    June 23, 2017
    Best known for her iconic images of migrant farmworkers during the Depression, the Bay Area-based Dorothea Lange also photographed the urban homeless and Japanese-Americans incarcerated during World War II. Her work further addressed community displacement and the urban criminal justice system, reflecting its racial and class issues.
  • Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary. Joe Hoyt/NOAA
    February 17, 2017
    Today, the Oakland Museum of California joins hundreds of other organizations to mark the #DayofFacts. From the treatment of Native Californians to California's shared history with Mexico, to how climate change impacts Yosemite and the Bay Area, OMCA's collections and galleries are an incredibly rich and trusted source of facts on a range of topics.
  • Photo: Josue Rivas
    February 10, 2017
    For centuries, Native Americans have resisted attacks on their lives and their lands. The struggle against the Dakota Access Pipeline is the latest chapter in this long and bloody history. History Now, a new installation in the OMCA Gallery of California History, compares the past with the present on this topic. OMCA staff asked Joey Montoya, a Lipan Apache from the Bay Area, to visit Standing Rock in November 2016 and interview indigenous protectors there.
  • "Love makes america great" and other notes written on the OMCA chalkboard walk by marchers at the Women's March. Photo: Emily Quist
    January 27, 2017
    In 2017, the people of Oakland made history. Part of the coordinated national and international Women’s Marches, the Oakland March took place at 11 am on January 21, the day after the presidential inauguration. In San Francisco and Oakland, both events had estimated crowds of 100,000 people who marched in the cold and rain to show their solidarity. Many of OMCA’s own staff participated—check out some of their photos, reflections, and reasons for marching. 
  • Corrina Gould, Native American Educator at OMCA, with a group of students, showing them original Ohlone territories in the Bay Area. Photo: Odell Hussey Photography
    November 18, 2016
    As part of our School Programs offerings, Bay Area students get an opportunity to learn with Native American educator Corrina Gould, who teaches a portion of the school program called California Indian Living. In an interactive presentation, Gould shares about her cultural heritage, identity, and the ways in which Native Californians are continuing to teach and honor their traditions.

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