OMCA Blog: All Posts

  • The White Elephant Sale is in a 96,000 square foot warehouse. Photo: Odell Hussey Photography
    March 1, 2017
    The annual White Elephant Sale is back for two days—March 4 and 5, 10 am to 4 pm both days. Don’t miss out on amazing finds from bikes and sports equipment to vintage hats, purses, and gloves, to vinyl records, furniture, dishware, and more. All proceeds from the event go to support the Oakland Museum of California’s programs and exhibitions. Whether it’s your first time attending or you’re a seasoned shopper, here are tips about how to make the most of the famed Sale.  
  • Ericka Huggins. Photo: Terry Lorant
    February 22, 2017
    Ericka Huggins led the Black Panther Party’s Los Angeles chapter with her husband, John Huggins, only to have to cope with his killing; she endured two years in jail while awaiting trial with Bobby Seale; and later became director of the groundbreaking Oakland Community School. Huggins is now a speaker and teacher who engages audiences at leading universities and offers relaxation classes in youth correctional facilities.
  • Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary. Joe Hoyt/NOAA
    February 17, 2017
    Today, the Oakland Museum of California joins hundreds of other organizations to mark the #DayofFacts. From the treatment of Native Californians to California's shared history with Mexico, to how climate change impacts Yosemite and the Bay Area, OMCA's collections and galleries are an incredibly rich and trusted source of facts on a range of topics.
  • Dorothea Lange, Manzanar Relocation Center, June 29, 1942. Gelatin silver  print, 11 x 14 in. Collection of the Oakland Museum of California, gift of Paul S.  Taylor
    February 15, 2017
    When OMCA reinstalled its Gallery of California History five years ago, the Sent Away exhibit concerning the Tanforan Assembly Center in San Bruno, where over seven thousand Japanese Americans were held before being sent to internment camps, struck a deep chord for many visitors. It had particular resonance for those of Japanese ancestry, many of whom had firsthand knowledge of this dark moment in our history.
  • Photo: Josue Rivas
    February 10, 2017
    For centuries, Native Americans have resisted attacks on their lives and their lands. The struggle against the Dakota Access Pipeline is the latest chapter in this long and bloody history. History Now, a new installation in the OMCA Gallery of California History, compares the past with the present on this topic. OMCA staff asked Joey Montoya, a Lipan Apache from the Bay Area, to visit Standing Rock in November 2016 and interview indigenous protectors there.